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ILAB Library - All You Need To Know About Rare Books and the Antiquarian Book Trade

  • Announcing the Text: The Development of the Title Page, 1470–1900

    An exhibition in the National Gallery of Art Library. It traces the development of the title page presenting wonderful examples of early books of the 15th century through modern books of the late 19th century.

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  • Prints as historical evidence: Lincoln’s deathbed

    Prints as historical evidence: Lincoln’s deathbed

    The assassination and death of Abraham Lincoln on April 14th and 15th, 1865 sent a shock throughout the nation, generating an intense desire by the American public to find out details about this tragedy. Printmakers, both for illustrated newspapers and for separately-issued prints, met this public interest with an outpouring of images. As there was no television nor internet at the time, and as there are few photographs of any of the events surrounding Lincoln’s death, these prints provided the public at that time with their only visual assess to the assassination and its aftermath ...

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  • Bruce Marshall's Pilgrim's Progress - An Interview with Beatie Wolfe

    Bruce Marshall's Pilgrim's Progress  - An Interview with Beatie Wolfe

    From vintage cars (how many rare book dealers drive an Aston Martin?) and guitars to Beslers, Blaeus and Goulds, Bruce Marshall, a major but discreet player in the colour-plate, natural history and travel book fields, reveals to Beatie Wolfe his pilgrim’s progress through the rare book world.

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  • In the Press - Rare Kepler Book Returns to Stralsund, Germany

    In the Press - Rare Kepler Book Returns to Stralsund, Germany

    "May I please give this book back to Stralsund. It is a great day for the German-American friendship, for the cities of New York and Stralsund and a great day for rare and valuable books in archives and in libraries." With these words rare book dealer Jonathan Hill, New York, handed over a unique early edition of Johannes Kepler's works which had once belonged to the archive of Stralsund (Germany). For centuries the worth of the book had been unknown. A year and a half ago Jonathan Hill discovered the book in a catalogue. It had been sold together with the whole Stralsund archives and was now offered by an auction house. Jonathan Hill bought the book and, as he said in a press conference on 15th April 2014, brought it back to where it belongs: to Stralsund.

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  • New Work On Irish Painter, Jack Yeats

    New Work On Irish Painter, Jack Yeats

    "It was not easy to be Jack Butler Yeats. Beset with the dual burden of identity and fame, he wisely distanced himself from most of the Yeatses and proved more a Pollexfen (his mother's line) than a Yeats. In the second half of his career (circa 1920s-1950s), when he moved from commercial art to fine art, he proved more a European painter than an Irish one ..."

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  • A Personal Library

    A Personal Library

    I do not think enough people have a personal library. A library with real wood shelves, not boxes under the bed and a library that has to be dusted (once in awhile). A library where all your treasures are placed... just the way you want them.

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  • Rare Books in the Press - Robert the Bruce Letter Found at British Library

    Rare Books in the Press - Robert the Bruce Letter Found at British Library

    “A previously unknown letter of Robert the Bruce, addressed to the king of England, has been found in a British Library manuscript. The letter was written in 1310, and reveals how, when faced with an English army marching into Scotland, Robert made an eloquent appeal to King Edward II, asking for peace on the understanding that Scottish independence be recognized. Robert's letter, written in Latin, is entered into the pages of a manuscript made towards the end of the 15th century by the monks of Kirkstall Abbey (Yorkshire). Its significance was recognised by Professor Dauvit Broun of the University of Glasgow, the principal investigator of the Breaking of Britain project (Cross-border society and Scottish independence, 1216-1314) ...”

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  • Collecting Rare Books and First Editions: Time Travel for Dummies

    Collecting Rare Books and First Editions: Time Travel for Dummies

    When my accountant said, “Hey, you’ve had another good year,” my response was, “You’ve got to be kidding!” But then, looking back, I remembered some happy referrals, several fascinating consignments and, in general, quite a bit of successful book scouting.  Ten Pound Island’s  invoices and check stubs (all digital!) told the story in detail. My "new business model," concocted so painfully over the past year, paid off. I dropped the California, Florida, and New York book fairs, cut expenses way back, moved from hard copy to web based catalogs, and quoted a lot more books using specially tailored, richly illustrated e-based catalogs.

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  • How To Identify Simon & Schuster First Editions

    How To Identify Simon & Schuster First Editions

    One of the four largest English-language publishing houses, Simon & Schuster now publishes over 2,000 titles a year under 35 different imprints. The firm started by publishing crossword puzzle books and grew to publish some of the world's most recognized authors. How to identify Simon & Schuster first editions.

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  • These Days of Hatlessness - Emily Post's Etiquette

    These Days of Hatlessness - Emily Post's Etiquette

    Should I cover my tattoos and piercings before a job interview? Should I throw a divorce party? These questions are considered in the 18th edition of Emily Post’s famous book on “Etiquette”, revised and updated by the author’s great-granddaughter. If you want to learn how to have a love affair or a cup of tea in high society during the 1920s, read the original edition, or Jack Lynch’s collecting tip! Jack Lynch ist English professor at Rutgers University in Newark and the author of “You Could Look It Up: The Reference Shelf from Babylon to Wikipedia”. In his blog “You Could Look It Up” he introduces (no: he presents) useful, classic, amazing, funny and extraordinary dictionaries of all possible subjects and from all centuries.

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  • Collecting Rare Books and First Editions: It's Purely Academic at The Private Library

    Collecting Rare Books and First Editions: It's Purely Academic at The Private Library

    Anyone who reads much so-called academic fiction may be forgiven for thinking that some of the folks teaching our sons and daughters are, for the most part, a bunch of narcissistic, neurotic misfits (Malcom Bradbury: The History Man; Elain Showalter: Faculty Towers).  Although the rise of this fictional genre began in earnest in the mid 1950s, its roots can be traced as far back as Anthony Trollope's 1857 novel of provincial Anglican preferment, Barchester Towers, and - more to the point - George Eliot's Middlemarch (1872).

     

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  • Antiquarian Booksellers in Exile – Paul Graupe (1881-1953)

    Antiquarian Booksellers in Exile – Paul Graupe (1881-1953)

    The seizure of power by the Nazis in 1933 was a decisive event in the world of book collecting. Numerous dealers and collectors – among them the most famous of the trade – were murdered by the Nazis. Those who survived were forced to close their companies and to hand them over to the Nazis. Ernst Fischer’s biographical handbook "Verleger, Buchhändler & Antiquare aus Deutschland und Österreich in der Emigration nach 1933" reconstructs the biographies of all German and Austrian booksellers, publishers and auctioneers who emigrated from Germany after 1933. The International League of Antiquarian Booksellers is proud to publish some of the most impressive stories told in Ernst Fischer’s book on its website. This article in a series of 25 booksellers' biographies is dedicated to Paul Graupe.

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