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Amsterdam 1975 | | Amsterdam 1975

Amsterdam 1975

Published on 22 Feb. 2018

Newsletter 27

 

MINUTES OF THE COMMITTEE MEETING

AMSTERDAM: SEPTEMBER 22, 1975

 

Present: The complete Committee:

Dr. Frieder Kocher-Benzing, President

Stanley Crowe, Vice-President

Glen Dawson, Treasurer

Hans Bagger, Bob de Graaf, Mitsuo Nitta, Pierre Petitot, Committee Members

Also: Fernand De Nobele and Einar Gronholt Pedersen, Presidents of Honour.

Interpreter: Edgar Franco.

The meeting was opened by the President at 9.00 a.m. He welcomed those present, and asked to observe a minute's silence in memory of those who had lately passed away, especially mentioning our late President of Honour, Mr. Richard Wormser.

The President then proceeded to consider the Agenda prepared for the forthcoming General Assembly and to discuss it point by point.

1. Nomination of scrutineers: This was left to the General Assembly.

 

2. Approval of the official report of the President's Meeting in Turin,September 24-25, 1974: This report would be approved by the General Assembly as well.

 

3a. President's report on the League's activities since September 1974: The President proposed to deliver a short report at the forthcoming Presidents' Meeting, and a full report at the forthcoming General Assembly. This was approved.

 

3b. Secretary's report on the League's activities since September 1974: The acting Secretary asked permission to act likewise which was approved.

 

4. Treasurer's Report: The President proposed that this should, in the main, be discussed at the President's Meeting. The  Treasurer drew attention to his proposal that under the new Treasurer. all the League’s funds would be under one management, and in one currency. Mr. De Nobele stated that the respective strength or weakness of a given currency and the rate of interest available was important. The President proposed that an enquiry should be made into the rates of interest at different Danish banks, and that the decision should be left to the new Treasurer and to himself. Mr. Bagger indicated that it would be preferable to keep the larger Dutch saving's account intact for the time being, and that the former USA. funds could be transferred to Denmark.

 

5. Round Table Brussels: Nothing further to report. The next meeting of the Round Table has been fixed for January 31-February 1, 1976, and Mr. Moorthamers will represent the League.

The President stressed the desirability for all associations whose countries are members of the E.E.C. to send a representative. Mr. Petitot stated that the agenda for the Round Table is drawn up without reference to- or consultation with the delegates.

 

6. Preparation of a new Directory: The President announced that Mr. Bagger is willing to act as editor, and thanked him for his willingness to undertake such a heavy task.

Mr. Dawson stated that the Committee has created a new function, viz. 'Editor of the Directory' and wanted to use this opportunity to discuss the position of the acting Secretary. He proposed that Mr. de Graaf should be officially appointed the League's Secretary as he had been doing the work. Mr. De Nobele pointed out that the Rules did not allow this. Mr. Crowe said that it was within the prerogative of the Committee to put forward an official proposal to change the Rules to allow the inclusion of such a function. Mr. Dawson agreed, but then proposed that the Committee appoint Mr. de Graaf as its official Secretary for the coming twelve months.

At the request of Mr. Dawson, the President put the two propositions to the vote.

First proposition: All in favour; one abstention.

Second proposition: All against except Mr. Dawson: one abstention.

Discussion on the new Directorv was resumed. Mr. Franco stated that the list of specialities he had offered to prepare, had proved an impossible task. It was agreed that the choice of specialities to be mentioned be left to each individual member.

Distribution of the entry forms would be made by each national association.

Mr. de Graaf urged that is must be clearly understood that the responsibility for the correctness of all data lies with each national association, and that the editor cannot be responsible for errors.

 

7. Bibliographical Prize: The President stated that the Jury would announce its final decision in the Spring, 1976.

Mr. Dawson proposed that the Bibliographical Prize be reviewed, with particular reference to its expense and future. It was agreed that this should appear on the agenda for the next Committee Meeting.

 

8. Confidential List: The President drew attention to his proposal to issue annual lists compiled in two categories:

(a) Doubtful or slow payers; (b) Those who should never be allowed credit.

This provoked considerable discussion which was adjourned at 11.15 for the Presidents' Meeting.

Before adjourning, Mr. Crowe asked permission to thank Mr. Dawson, on behalf of the entire Committee, for all he had done for the League in an extremely difficult period. This was applauded.

 

The Committee Meeting was resumed at 12.50 a.m.

 

8. Confidential List (Continued): Mr. De Nobele stated that the responsibility for the dispersal of the names on the Confidential List would have to lie with the national associations, and that these would have to sign an agreement to that effect.

It was further agreed to publish yearly lists with supplements when necessary.

A typographic system to distinguish different categories of bad, slow or non-payers was discussed at length. It was agreed that lists of names for inclusion in the Confidential List be supplied by national associations only and not by individual members. It was agreed, also, that some kind of liaison be established with the Security Committee. Mr. Petitot agreed to undertake the editing of the Confidential List. Details will be sent to the national associations as soon as possible.

 

9. Security and Book Thefts: The President said that it was unfortunate that the meeting of the Security Committee had to be held after the closing of the Congress.

Mr. Crowe pointed out that the primary importance is actually that the meeting will take place, and announced the agenda for that meeting.

 

Meeting adjourned at 2.00 p.m. in view of the forthcoming General Assembly.

 

The Committee Meeting was resumed at 3.10 p.m.

(The entire Committee was present, but without the Presidents of Honour Mr. De Nobele and Mr. Gronholt Pedersen.)

 

10. Revision of the Rules: The Committee proposes to cancel point 5 of the Rules: On this, the Committee's own proposal there was no discussion. Mr. Crowe concluded that in historical perspective the situation is being reversed.

 

11. Proposal by the N.V.V.A.: "That the I.L.A.B. organize an International Symposium, to take place at the next Congress (1977), to discuss and study prospects for the future of the antiquarian book trade throughout the world".

The discussion centred on the question whether this would have to be an I.L.A.B. initiative, a matter to be organized by the inviting association, or organized by the Dutch association which made the proposal.

The Committee decided to wait taking a stand until the Dutch President had elucidated the proposal of his organization.

 

12. Proposal by the S.B.L.A.M.: "Possibility to standardize valuation rates and adherence to rates in use in other countries in accordance with the rules of national associations".

The President was of the opinion that this is partly treated in articles 13 and 14 of our Compendium of Usages and Customs.

Mr. Crowe drew the attention to the fact that systems and tariffs vary from country to country and from dealer to dealer.

Mr. Bagger urged that the President and Committee look into this with the idea of formulating a proposition in respect of uniformity.

Mr. Dawson suggested that it would be useful to publish in the Newsletter a review of the systems pertaining in the affiliated countries.

 

13. Election of new Committee Members: This was for the General Assembly.

 

14. Future Meetings: The President gratefully mentioned the invitations already received.

Mr. Dawson, whilst understanding the difficulty of the great distance, would like some future meeting to take place in the U.S.A.

 

15. Sundry Matters: Mr. Crowe proposed that this, in future, be styled "any other business".

The President stated that the A.B.A. wished to discuss the problem of membership in different associations. Mr. Crowe explained that in Great Britain a candidate for membership must have worked as an antiquarian bookseller, full time, for a period of at least five years. The candidate required two proposers and two seconders. Conditions of membership varied and were sometimes less stringent in other countries. This gives rise to the possibility of difficulties when a member of one association applies for membership of another. and in particular in relation to such events as Book Fairs.

Mr. Nitta made the suggestion that the League should take an initiative and organize gifts of books by dealers which could be used to benefit various philanthropic purposes. This had been done with great success in Japan, and has attracted good publicity. The President thanked Mr. Nitta for his suggestion, but had reservations as to its being workable. He was of the view that this could be better realized on a national level. Mr. Nitta said he would take this up with the national presidents, but not in the Presidents' Meeting or in the General Assembly.

 

There being no further business, the President closed the Meeting at 4.25 p.m.

 

MINUTES OF THE PRESIDENTS' MEETING

(FIRST SESSION)

AMSTERDAM: SEPTEMBER 22, 1975

 

Present: The complete Committee:

Dr. Frieder Kocher-Benzing, President

Stanley Crowe, Vice-President

Glen Dawson, Treasurer

Hans Bagger, Bob de Graaf, Mitsuo Nitta, Pierre Petitot, Committee Members;

Fernand De Nobele, Einar Gronholt Pedersen and Fl. Tulkens, Presidents of Honour;

And the Presidents or Representatives of the national associations:

Messrs. Taeuber (Austria), Moorthamers (Belgium), Heinemann (Canada), Bagger (Denmark; also present as a committee member), Magis (France), Koerner (Germany), Swarm (Great Britain), Chellini (Italy) , Sakai (Japan), Benjamins (Netherlands), Ringstrom (Norway), Laube

(Switzerland), Howell (U.S.A.).

Interpreter: Edgar Franco.

 

The meeting was opened by the President at 11.15 a.m. He welcomed those present, and asked to observe a minute's silence in memory of those who had lately passed away, especially mentioning our late President of Honour, Mr. Richard Wormser.

 

Representatives: As their respective Presidents could not attend this meeting, Austria was represented by Mr. Taeuber, Italy by Mr. Chellini, Japan by Mr. Sakai Jr., and the D.S.A. by Mr. Howell (Vice-President of the A.B.A.A.) .

 

Proxies: The proxy for Brazil was held by Mr. de Graaf; that for Finland by Mr. Benjamins; that for Sweden by Mr. Bagger.

 

Having stated this, the President proceeded to consider the Agenda prepared for the forthcoming General Assembly, and to discuss it point by point.

 

1. Nomination of scrutineers: This was left to the General Assembly.

 

2. Approval of the official report of the Presidents' Meeting in Turin, September 24-25, 1974: Approved unanimously.

 

3a. President's report on the League's activities since September 1974: This report was mainly concerned with routine matters. The President stated that as an ex officio member of the Societe Internationale des Bibliophiles, he had attended a meeting of that Society in Oxford, in December 1974. As both the Societe Internationale des Bibliophiles and the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers have congresses every two years, there is need for co-ordination concerning the dates. Unfortunately this year the Congress of the Societe which takes place in Switzerland partly overlaps our International Book Fair which follows this Congress.

 

3b. Secretary's report on the League's activities since September 1974: The acting Secretary asked for permission to read a full report at the forthcoming General Assembly. He announced that his report would chiefly deal with two matters: Matters secretarial and the Newsletter. His request was approved.

 

4. Treasurer's Report: There was no discussion and no questions were asked.

 

5. Round Table Brussels: The President stressed the desirability for all associations whose countries are members of the E.E.C. to send a representative to the next meeting to be held in Brussels on January 31st and February 1st, 1976.

Mr. Magis pointed out that the agenda for the Round Table is prepared without reference to, or consultation with the delegates or officers of the various Antiquarian Booksellers' Associations. In consequence we have no influence on matters discussed, and the delegates listen to reports by civil servants, rather as observers than participants in the discussion. Mr. Magis urged the Committee to take an initiative and seek to change this state of affairs, and also urged that all national associations whose countries are members of the E.E.C. send a representative.

Mr. Crowe stressed that in the future a number of vital problems are likely to come up for discussion, in particular the matter of Value Added Tax.

Mr. Laube stated that, in any move toward uniformity, he feared that there is a real danger of V.A.T. being fixed at the highest level.

Mr. Taeuber asked what was the relation between Unesco and the Round Table of the E.E.C. countries. He was informed that there was none.

 

6. Preparation of a new Directory: Mr. Bagger, the new editor of the Directory, requested all the Presidents and Representatives of the national associations to react promptly and to send correct copy.

Appropriate circulars will be forwarded to the national organisations in a few weeks time.

The acting Secretary added that all copy should be typed, and that the responsibility for the correctness of all data would exclusively lie,with the national associations and not with the editor.

 

7. Bibliographical Prize: The President announced that the Jury's final decision will be taken in Spring 1976, and the Prize will be awarded in the fall of that year.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 12.50 a.m.

 

MINUTES OF THE PRESIDENTS' MEETING

(SECOND SESSION)

AMSTERDAM, SEPTEMBER 23, 1975

 

Present: The complete Committee:

Dr. Frieder Kocher-Benzing, President

Stanley Crowe, Vice-President

Glen Dawson, Treasurer

Hans Bagger, Bob de Graaf, Mitsuo Nitta, Pierre Petitot, Committee Members;

And the following Presidents or Representatives of national associations:

Messrs. Taeuber (Austria), Moorthamers (Belgium), Heinemann (Canada), Bagger (Denmark; also present as a committee member), Magis (France), Koerner (Germany), Swann (Great Britain), Chellini (Italy), Sakai (Japan), Benjamins (Netherlands), Ringstrom (Norway), Laube (Switzerland), Howell (D.S.A.). ~ At the request of Mr. Dawson, Mr. William Salloch (candidate as a new committee member) is attending, this meeting as a guest.

Interpreter: Edgar Franco.

The meeting was opened by the President at 9.05 a.m.

He commenced by asking the Treasurer to proceed to fix the subscriptions for the year 1976. The Treasurer asked each President or Representative in turn and the subscriptions were affirmed as follows:

Country            Proposed 1976                 Affirmed

France             $ 800                             ce has to consult its members.

Germany         $ 800                         Ditto. but in principle approved.

Great Britain    $ 800                              Ditto. but in principle approved.

U.SA                $ 800                                     Approved.

Austria             $ 130                                    Approved.

Belgium            $ 140                                    Approved.

Brazil                $ 30                                    Approved.

Canada             $ 115                                    Approved.

Denmark          $ 180                                    Approved.

Finland             $ 30                                    Approved.

Italy                $ 225                                     Approved.

Japan              $ 175                                    Approved.

Netherland       $ 250                                    Approved.

Norway             $ 60                                    Raised to $ 70

Sweden             $125                                     Approved.

Switzerlan       $ 240                                    Approved.

 

The President thanked the Presidents and the Representatives for their cooperation.

 

8. Confidential List: The President invited Mr. Petitot to explain a system which he had worked out in co-operation with Mr. De Nobele. Mr. Petitot proposed that all earlier lists should be cancelled and a new one issued. On this new list bad-payers would figure in bold type ("bad" in this context meaning persons not likely to pay at all); slow-payers in normal Roman characters; and a third category in italic type indicating that care should be taken. Confidential information to be supplied by the national associations to Mr. Petitot as specified, and under their responsibility. Distribution within any given association to be at the discretion of its own committee. Supplements to the main (annual) list to be issued as required. The President emphasized the importance of a confidential list which is really up-to-date.

Mr. Laube asked whether the yearly lists were meant to be cumulative. - Yes.

Mr. Howell explained that the distribution of such a confidential list within the United States is forbidden; it could however be posted from outside the US.A.

Mr. Heinemann wished to know who will be responsible for the names figuring on the confidential list. Answer: The Committee of the national association which has offered the name for inclusion in the list.

Mr. Benjamins was of the opinion that the categories proposed are too vague: It will be especially difficult to distinguish between names printed in a normal- and those printed in italic type.

Mr. Petitot promised to send a circular to all national associations explaining the system chosen and requesting names to be included.

Mr. Howell requested that no confidential lists be sent to the U.S.A. by mail, but preferably by courier (laughter).

 

9. Security and Book Thefts: After both the President and the Vice-President had spoken a few words by way of introduction, the agenda of the forthcoming meeting of security officers was read by Mr. Magis.

For the time being there were no questions on this subject. The acting Secretary asked Mr. Magis to send him minutes of the meeting for inclusion in the next Newsletter. Mr. Magis agreed to do this.

 

10. Revision of the Rules: The Committee proposes to cancel point 5 of the Rules: The President explained why this particular point (reading: "The League is registered in Geneva") better be cancelled. He concluded that - if this proposition is adopted by the General Assembly the seat of the League would automatically be the seat of the current President.

This point did not give rise to discussion.

 

11. Proposal by the NVV.A. (For the exact wording of this proposal cf. the Minutes of the Committee Meeting).

The President invited Mr. Benjamins to speak. Mr. Benjamins introduced his association's proposal, stating that it was of the opinion that this is a matter of fundamental professional interest. He felt that, as a matter of principle, it should be organized by the League Committee.

The President requested the Vice-President to speak on the proposal. Mr. Crowe began by saying that the League Committee is all in favour of the idea put forward by the Dutch Association. It was not, however, clear whether the Committee would be best equipped to organize an event of this kind but doubtless could be of assistance. This could be discussed in detail at the League Committee Meeting early in 1976. The President added that the League Committee had other tasks on hand. Mr. Crowe, in conclusion, said that the Dutch proposal needed further exploration as to how it could be worked out.

Mr. Nitta made the comment that the agenda for Presidents' Meetings and Congresses were much of the same pattern and that it was desirable that new elements should be introduced.

Mr. Swarm stated that the A.B.A. was entirely in favour of the Dutch proposal, which in his opinion, was the most important point on the whole agenda. The problems related to the future of the antiquarian book trade are directly concerned with our livelihood.

Mr. Bagger supported the Dutch proposal. He wondered whether it would be possible to find someone willing to organize such an event. In the discussion, the name of Professor Gordon Ray was mentioned. This gentleman is an acknowledged expert, and if he would be willing to come to Frankfurt in 1977, the League would gladly pay his expenses.

Following the discussion, Mr. Benjamins said that, in his view, there are two main points: (a) That the Congresses of the League should embody a further element, and in addition to routine matters and social events, there should be discussions on subjects of general professional interest, and (b) that the arrangement of such discussions should be organized by the League Committee. He also considered that the matter was one of urgency.

Mr. Magis suggested that it would be useful to invite each national association to give its views and ideas on the organisation of events of this kind, and that delegates could report at the Presidents' Meeting in 1976.

Mr. Laube was of the opinion that the proposal under discussion was somewhat abstract. He would like more definite particulars.

Mr. Dawson said that the discussion had taken a considerable amount of time, and proposed that it should be continued in the General Assembly.

Mr. Benjamins agreed, and said that in order to facilitate discussion he was willing to cancel the words "International Symposium" from the Dutch proposal and substitute "Event".

The President thanked Mr. Benjamins and those who had taken part in the discussion.

 

12. Proposal by the S.B.L.A.M. (For the exact wording of this proposal cf. the Minutes of the Committee Meeting): The meeting decided to discuss this item during the General Assembly.

 

13. Election of new Committee members: This IS a matter for the General Assembly.

 

14. Future meetings: Dates to be announced at the General Assembly.

 

15. Any other business: Mr. Dawson stated that the Committee of the AB.AA is studying the problem of membership in different associations.

 

There being no further business, the President closed the meeting at 10.35 a.m.

 

 

MINUTES OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY

AMSTERDAM: SEPTEMBER 22, 1975

 

Present: The complete Committee:

Dr. Frieder Kocher-Benzing, President

Stanley Crowe, Vice-President

Glen Dawson, Treasurer

Hans Bagger, Bob de Graaf, Mitsuo Nitta, Pierre Petitot, Committee Members;

And: Fernand De Nobele, Einar Gronholt Pedersen, Fl. Tulkens, Presidents of Honour.

Interpreter: Mr. Edgar Franco.

The meeting was opened by the President at 2.10 p.m. He welcomed those present, and asked them to observe a minute's silence in memory of those who had lately passed away, especially mentioning our late President of Honour, Mr. Richard Wormser.

Representatives: Austria is represented by Mr. Taeuber, Italy by Mr. Chellini, Japan by Mr. Sakai Jr., and the US.A. by Mr. Howell (VicePresident of the A.B.A.A.) .

 

Proxies: The proxy for Brazil is held by Mr. de Graaf; that for Finland by Mr. Benjamins; that for Sweden by Mr. Bagger.

The other countries are represented by their national Presidents, in order that all sixteen associations affiliated with the I.L.A.B appear to be represented, totalling twenty votes (France, Germany, Great Britain and the D.S.A. have two votes each).

 

Apologies have been received from the associations from Brazil, Finland and Sweden; from Messrs. Deny, Massey and Muir (Presidents of Honour); and from Mr. Menno Hertzberger (Father of the League).

 

This having been stated, the President proceeded to take up the Agenda prepared for this General Assembly, and to discuss it point by point.

 

1. Nomination of scrutineers: Messrs. Francois Chamonal and Eric Morton are appointed.

 

2. Approval of the official report of the President's Meeting in Turin, September 24-25, 1974: This report which has already been approved by the preceding Presidents' Meeting was accepted without further discussion.

 

3a. President's report on the League's activities since September 1974: This report which was mainly concerned with routine matters was approved unanimously.

 

3b. Secretary's report on the League's activities since September 1974: This report dealt with the League's correspondence, the editing of the minutes, and the Newsletter. The Secretary announced that the printing-costs of Newsletter 24 were entirely covered and those of Newsletter 25 for 90 %, by advertisements. Prospects for Newsletter 26 - distributed among the delegates shortly before - appeared to be favourable as well. The Secretary asked the national Presidents to bring the possibility of advertising in the Newsletter to the attention of their members, and thanked all those who had been helpful with translations and corrections. He recommended that the next Secretary and the next Editor of the League's Newsletter be in full command of at least one of the two languages acknowledged by the Rules (French and English). The report was approved unanimously.

 

4. Treasurer's Report: The Treasurer had at an earlier stage prepared a financial statement covering the year 1974, of the assets and disbursements of the U.S.A. accounts. The acting Secretary had done the same for the various Dutch accounts (see separate reports printed in Newsletter 26, pages 20-22). In addition both Treasurer and acting Secretary had prepared Interim reports for the period January 1 - August 31, 1975 (see separate reports appended) .

No questions were asked and all financial reports were unanimously approved. The Treasurer informed the General Assembly that he had now closed the USA.-accounts, and handed over a check of the balance of same ($13.340,45) to his successor with his very best wishes (Applause);

 

5. Round Table Brussels: There was no further discussion.

 

6. Preparation of a new Directory: The President invited Mr. Bagger to speak who outlined his proposals, and asked all national Presidents for their co-operation.

 

7. Bibliographical Prize: The President announced that the Jury's final decision will be taken in Spring 1976, and that the Prize will be awarded in the fall of that year. Seventeen bibliographical works had been received for review by the Jury, and the general quality was very good.

The President then informed the General Assembly that the previous President's Meeting had only progressed up to- and including point 7 of the Agenda. With thanks to the delegates he closed the meeting at 3.00 p.m.

 

MINUTES OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY

(SECOND SESSION)

AMSTERDAM: SEPTEMBER 23, 1975

 

Present: The complete Committee:

Dr. Frieder Kocher-Benzing, President

Stanley Crowe, Vice-President

Glen Dawson, Treasurer

Hans Bagger, Bob de Graaf, Mitsuo Nitta, Pierre Petitot, Committee Members;

And: Fernand De Nobele, Einar Gronholt Pedersen, Fl. Tulkens, Presidents of Honour.

Interpreter: Mr. Edgar Franco.

The meeting was opened by the President at 10.45 a.m. He welcomed the delegates and continued discussion of the agenda:

 

8. Confidential List: The President invited Mr. Petitot to speak. Mr. Petitot explained the new system which the Committee had in mind.

 

9. Security and Book Thefts: At the request of the President Mr. Magis read the agenda which had been prepared for the meeting of security officers later that week.

The President urged the national Presidents and Representatives to support the work of the Security Committee.

 

10. Revision of the Rules: The Committee proposes to cancel point 5 of the Rules: This point did not give rise to discussion and was approved unanimously.

 

11. Proposal by the N.V.V.A. (For the exact wording of this proposal cf. the Minutes of the Committee Meeting): Mr. Benjamins elucidated the proposal of his association, and his speech met with applause.

On behalf of the League Committee, the President asked Mr. Benjamins to provide a working-paper which can be discussed at the Committee meeting to be held early in 1976. A formulated scheme could then be proposed at the Presidents' Meeting in the autumn of 1976. It was also suggested that the working-paper could be included in the Newsletter.

Mr. Fletcher was in favour of inviting an outside guest speaker.

Mr. Swann stated that the Dutch proposal concerned a vital aspect of our trade, and that its problems relate to the livelihood of every antiquarian bookseller. His association warmly supported the Dutch proposal.

Mr. Benjamins asked that a vote be taken on his association's proposal.

It was agreed unanimously.

 

12. Proposal by the S.B.L.A.M. (For the exact wording of this proposal cf. the Minutes of the Committee Meeting): Mr. Moorthamers elucidated the proposal of his association. He said that he realized that the first part of his proposal ("Possibility to standardize valuation rates ...") had to remain a wish. However in the opinion of his association "adherence to rates in use in other countries" could well be realized, and it was there that the crux of the Belgian proposal actually lay.

The President asked the delegates what rates were in use in their respective countries.

From the answers it appeared that percentages widely vary from country to country. Only a few associations have fixed rates. No fixed rates exist in countries like France and England; in the U.S.A. any system of fixed rates is impossible as being contradictory to the antitrust-laws.

Mr. Moorthamers regretted that it appeared impossible to agree rates for valuation on an international level, and asked the President whether it would be possible to make some kind of recommendation. The President proposed that national valuation rates, if any, be published in the Newsletter and that these be used as appropriate, in accordance with Article 13 of the Usages and Customs.

 

13. Election of new Committee Members: In the name of all present and especially on behalf of the Committee, the President thanked Mr. Glen Dawson for everything he had done for the League during his terms as a Treasurer (Applause).

The President then proposed to pass on to a secret vote which will be controlled by the two scrutineers.

Are elected afterwards: Mr. Hans Bagger as the new Treasurer (20 votes, i.e. unanimously); Mr. William Salloch as a new member of the Committee (20 votes, i.e. unanimously). - Exchange of thanks and congratulations.

Mr. Howell, seconded by Mr. Swarm, then came up with a motion to nominate Mr. de Graaf as a Secretary by giving him this title without the restriction expressed in the word "acting".

After some discussion this proposal was withdrawn as being contradictory with the Rules.

 

14. Future Meetings: The President outlined the invitations put forward by the various associations for the years 1976 up to and including 1980.

Mr. Howell offered to organize the Presidents' Meeting in 1978 in Los Angeles where it could be combined with an International Book Fair.

The President drew Mr. Howell's attention to the fact that there had already been received an invitation for that meeting by the Danske Antikvarboghandlerforening. He suggested that the A.B.A.A. consult the Danish association.

When asked, Mr. Koerner confirmed that the Verband Deutscher Antiquare was planning an International Book Fair to follow the Congress of 1977 in Germany.

 

15. Any other business: Mr. Fletcher Jr. informed the delegates about the dates of the next London Book Fair (June 15-17, 1976).

 

After a vote of thanks to the Committee and to Mr. Edgar Franco, the meeting was closed at 12.20 a.m.

 

REPORT TO MEMBERS OF ILAB

 

It has been my privilege and honor to serve you as Treasurer for the past six years. During that time the United States dollar has been devalued, there have been currency fluctuations - and a world-wide inflation. There have been problems regarding the legal residence of the League - and the location of the League's funds.

Despite the unexpected problems, my term has been a memorable experience due to the cooperation and friendship of the members and officers of the League. My wife and I have appreciated the very generous hospitality extended to us in France, Great Britain, Germany, Denmark, Austria, Japan, Italy and in other countries - including most recently - here in the Netherlands.

My predecessor, Geoffry Steele, deserves much credit for his service to the League. Max Elte has been especially helpful in many ways including acting as Treasurer of funds on deposit in the Netherlands. Among others, Stanley Crowe, the late Richard Wormser, and our Secretary-General, Bob de Graaf have provided both practical assistance and encouragement.

To my successor I cheerfully hand over a check for $ 13.182. (plus the bank interest for July and August), - and all my very best wishes.

September 1975.

Glen Dawson.

 

MINUTES OF A COMMITTEE MEETING

AMSTERDAM: SEPTEMBER 24, 1975

 

Present: The complete Committee (in its new composition):

Dr. Frieder Kocher-Benzing, President

Stanley Crowe, Vice-President

Hans Bagger, Treasurer

Bob de Graaf, Mitsuo Nitta, Pierre Petitot, William Salloch, Committee Members.

 

The Meeting was opened by the President at 9.10 a.m.

 

The President stated that the purpose of this meeting of the new Committee was to review the discussions which had taken place during the Presidents' Meetings and the General Assemblies.

 

The following items of the agenda were considered:

 

6. Preparation of a new Directory: The marketing, the recommended price and the discount were discussed.

 

8. Confidential List: This is now in the hands of Mr. Petitot, and a bi-lingual letter explaining the new system will be sent to the national associations as soon as possible.

 

9. Security and Book Thefts: The Committee will wait until the results of the meeting of security officers are known.

 

11. Proposal by the N.V.V.A.: The President had asked Mr. Benjamins to send him details of the seminar proposed by the N.V.V.A. On receipt of this, he proposed to write to the national associations specifically seeking information regarding the economic situation of our trade in their respective countries. He suggested that this information could provide the basis of some kind of working-paper.

Mr. Salloch suggested that Professor Gordon Ray, if willing, could be invited to write a working-paper of this kind. It was also suggested that enquiry should be made whether Professor Ray would be willing to appear in person and lead the discussions. Mr. Salloch offered to contact Professor Ray.

 

12. Proposal by the S.B.L.A.M.: Note was taken of the desirability of publishing in the Newsletter the valuation-rates currently in use in the countries affiliated to the League.

 

At the close of the meeting, Mr. de Graaf stated that he will not be in a position to combine the functions of acting secretary and editor of the Newsletter when his term expires after the Presidents' Meeting in 1976. An exchange took place in respect of possible changes in the future.

Meeting closed at 11.50 a.m.

 

MINUTES OF A MEETING OF SECURITY

DELEGATES, AMSTERDAM: SEPTEMBER 26, 1975

 

The Meeting was opened by President Magis at 10 a.m.

Mr. Stanley Crowe apologised for the improvised meeting-place. The rooms on the first floor were being prepared for the installation of stands for the Fair.

Mr. Stanley Crowe thanked Mr. Magis for having agreed to preside at the meeting.

The President proceeded to the first item on the Agenda.

 

I. (a): To review the current situation.

Several countries had not sent delegates to the meeting in Paris held on February 13th, 1975. In addition to those represented in Paris, four national associations were represented in Amsterdam:

Italy: Mr. A. Pregliasco.

Canada: Mr. Heinemann.

U.S.A: Mr. Howell and Mr. Steedman.

Japan: Mr. Sakai Jr.

 

I. (b): To consider and make recommendation as to what action is needed internationally.

It is necessary to find an effective system for recovering stolen books and to catch thieves.

In the opinion of the delegates an effective system would be difficult

to operate.

 

II. The German delegate pointed out that apart from Great Britain, no other country had a central office. On the other hand, the German Association is in contact with the State Library of Bavaria which is equipped with an extensive computer. This could be enlisted in the search for stolen books. The financial cost of using the Bavarian State Library's computer has not yet been ascertained but it would certainly be less costly than using a computer belonging to a private company. In respect of the possible use of the Bavarian State Library's computer, several questions are posed: Should the information supplied by the computer be furnished to all countries? To all members of the I.L.A.B.? Only to the security delegates? How often should information be sent out? Once or twice a year?

The delegates from the United States also suggested a computer, but it would be necessary for them to make enquiries in order to find:

1. The best proposition.

2. Where the computer would be situated.

3. To find a technician who would be able to feed appropriate information into the computer. In any case, the cost was likely to be heavy.

President Magis suggested it would be necessary to co-ordinate information and to make contact with libraries and ask them to contribute towards the cost of providing information.

The British delegate suggested writing to auctioneers as well as libraries seeking their financial support.

Mrs. Parikian asked Mr. Stanley Crowe if the League could not contribute to the costs arising from the situation of the computer, in respect of the organisation of a central index or in respect of all action necessary to combat the scourge of book-stealing.

Mr. Stanley Crowe replied that the matter had been discussed by the League committee, but with the absence of any figure in respect of the cost, it had not been possible for the League committee to reply for the time being.

From all the discussions, and from the exchange of point of view between the delegates, it is clear that the cost of possible international action is the main problem and also the most thorny one.

In respect of financial aid which could be contributed by Libraries, President Magis wondered whether it was not up to the League to make contact with the Libraries.

The German delegate stated that in his view, that if our system is workable, the Libraries would certainly give it their support.

The Canadian delegate indicated that in his view international lists of stolen books seemed much more effective than those drawn up on a national basis.

Several conclusions and hopes were expressed:

- Lists of information would be quicker and more effective if they were sent direct to members rather than to security delegates.

- Each delegate should make personal contact with the Libraries in his own country.

- The President requested that Germany and the United States would send him a proposal in writing in respect of the cost of the use of a computer.

- It is necessary - as already put into practice in several countries to put a lower limit to the value of books figuring in lists which are distributed. (In Germany: 200 DM; in Great Britain: £50.).

- It is important that the name of the bookseller who has been robbed should appear in the lists so that information can be quickly circulated.

 

The President proceeded to item 4 of the Agenda.

In Great Britain, 5 police officers are employed entirely on thefts of objets d'art. The latter maintain close association with the A.B.A.

In this respect, it was noted that it is important to know if the thief is known to the police. That is necessary to decide the course of action when the thief is unmasked.

(It was pointed out that Interpol is only an Information Bureau. It is the national police alone who are able to take action against a thief.)

President Magis said that the most important thing was to recover stolen books. The arrangements among the booksellers seemed to him of first importance. The police are only necessary in quest of a thief.

Mr. Fletcher advised each association to be on good terms with the police. Several arrests of book thieves operating in England had been made possible thanks to the close co-operation between bookseller and the police.

 

Agenda: The next meeting of security delegates would take place in Stuttgart. The precise date would be notified later but will relate to the Fair (29 January-1 February 1976).

The fifth item on the Agenda could not be discussed through lack of time.

 

The President closed the meeting at 12.15 p.m.

 

[Minutes made by Mr. J. J. Magis]

 

MINUTES OF A COMMITTEE MEETING

STUTTGART: JANUARY 28, 1976

 

Present:

Dr. Frieder Kocher-Benzing, President

Stanley Crowe, Vice-President

Hans Bagger, Treasurer

Bob de Graaf, Pierre Petitot, William Salloch, Committee members.

Apologies were received from: Mr. Mitsuo Nitta, Committee member and Messrs. Einar Gronholt Pedersen, Fernand De Nobele, and Fl. Tulkens, Presidents of Honour.

 

The meeting was opened by the President at 4.10 p.m. He welcomed those present, and proceeded to consider the Agenda prepared for this meeting and to discuss it point by point.

 

1. Approval of the Minutes of the Amsterdam meetings (September 22-23, 1975): These Minutes were approved unanimously.

 

2. Reports of President, Secretary and Treasurer:

 

a). The President had as yet not been able to contact Maitre Hotz, the Swiss lawyer, as hitherto no French translation of the Amsterdam Minutes was available. He will deal with the matter upon receipt of a copy of the French version.

Mr. Salloch had kindly sent the President a copy of Professor Gordon Ray's article "The world of rare books re-examined". This matter will be discussed under point 5 of the Agenda.

Mr. Moorthamers will again represent the League during the forthcoming Third Round Table Conference in Brussels (January 31 - February 1,1976).

 

b). The acting Secretary joined the President in expressing his thanks to Mr. Crowe (who had revised the English version of the Amsterdam Minutes) and Mr. Petitot (who had translated all the Minutes into French) .

The Organizing Committees of the forthcoming Book Fairs in Toronto (May 12th - May 14th, 1976) and San Francisco (September 16th - September 18th, 1976) have requested that publicity be given to these events in the next Newsletter.

Mr. Glen Dawson has written a letter about the organisation of the 1978 Presidents' Meeting in Los Angeles.

A letter of thanks has been received from Mrs. Carola Paine-Wormser.

Mr. Jake Chernowsky, Editor of the AB Bookman's Weekly, has expressed interest in publishing interesting information the League's Committee might be willing to supply. The Committee agreed that it would be worthwhile to send regular information to all trade periodicals.

 

c). The Treasurer had prepared a statement of Receipts and Disbursements for the period October 1 - December 31, 1975 (See separate Report attached). At the latter date the cash position was 76.419.000 Danish crowns, equalling approximately $12,426.00. For the time being two accounts will be kept in the Netherlands, viz. the 7.5% Saving's account to the amount of Guilders 25,000.- and the Swiss Francs account to the amount of 10,635.- Swiss Francs. There was no further discussion on this matter and the Treasurer's report was approved unanimously.

 

3. Directory Editor's Report: Mr. Bagger informed the Committee about the present prices for printing and binding: For 3000 copies printed (all on the same kind of paper) the total costs would be 128,000.- Danish crowns, to which has to be added the amount of 23,000.- Danish crowns for the assistant-editor, Mr. Pummer.

The entry-forms have in the meantime been sent to the national associations, and the typesetting can start as soon as the former have been returned.

After some discussion the Committee decided to fix the price of the Directory at $10.- net to booksellers and at $15.- retail sales-price.

The acting Secretary drew attention to the limited number of copies of the Dictionary still in stock and suggested that the price be raised to $20 -  which was approved.

The President thanked Mr. Bagger for his efforts on behalf of the new Directory.

 

4. B. de Graaf's Memorandum concerning the I.L.A.B.'s Secretariat:

The acting Secretary stressed that this was intended to be a working paper which could serve as a basis for further discussion. Mr. Crowe said that, whilst sympathizing with the Secretary's problems, he could not subscribe to his conclusions. The President stated that he had received from the S.L.A.M. a letter informing him that, in accordance with the decision taken by the General Assembly in Amsterdam, they would formally propose at the next Presidents' Meeting, that the rules be amended to include the function of Secretary, as agreed.

The acting Secretary said that he appreciated that this decision was binding, but regretted that owing to pressures he would be unable to continue as Secretary after September 1976. He would, however, if desired, continue as editor of the Newsletter.

The President regretted that Mr. de Graaf would be unable to continue as Secretary and thanked him warmly for offering to continue to produce the Newsletter. After further discussion, the President proposed that this should be considered in conjunction with item 8, Elections.

 

5. Symposium: "The future of the antiquarian book trade": The possible form and content were explored, without definite conclusion, as unfortunately the promised Memorandum by the Dutch President had not yet been received. (Secretary's note: It was handed to him just after the Stuttgart meeting and a photocopy has been sent to all Committee Members). It was agreed that an event of this nature would form part of the Congress in Frankfurt in 1977.

As time was progressing and Mr. Heinemann, President of the Antiquarian Booksellers' Association of Canada, had expressed an interest to attend the discussions on the subject of "Security" the President proposed to take up point 7 of the Agenda before point 6 which was accepted. Mr. Heinemann entered the meeting.

 

7. Security: Mr. Crowe read a letter from Mr. Werner Fritsch dated January 10, 1976, in which proposals were put forward for co-operation with the Bavarian State Library in Munich (Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, München) which has offered computer facilities. The expense involved was estimated by the Library at DM 6,000.- per annum.

Mr. Crowe was of the opinion that here, for the first time, was a positive proposition which should be explored, and which offered the advantage of a possible early start.

It was agreed that for speed, a sub-committee of three should be formed to investigate this and which would later report to a meeting of security delegates. Mr. Werner Fritsch, Mr. Jorg Schafer and Mr. Dieter Schierenberg would be asked to form the sub-committee.

Mr. Heinemann informed the Committee that Mr. George Lowry of Swann Galeries, New York, had worked out a similar system for the United States and Canada and which was being pursued. Mr. Heinemann will keep the Committee informed. It was agreed that an exchange

of data by the two systems would be a logical sequence. The President thanked Mr. Heinemann who then left the meeting.

 

6. Confidential List: Editor's Report: Mr. Petitot announced that, following the decision taken in Amsterdam, he had prepared a draft of a form. This draft met with the approval of the Committee and Mr. Crowe will translate it into English. Each national association will receive a set of forms in order to keep Mr. Petitot informed. Mr. Petitot will set up a central register on the basis of data supplied by the national organisations. Confidential Lists will be sent regularly to the national associations but only after they have signed an undertaking in respect of distribution.

 

8. Elections in fall of 1976: The President announced that he was not in a position to prolong his function after his term has come to an end in the fall of this year.

He proposed that the Vice-President, Mr. Stanley Crowe, be nominated as the next President. Mr. Crowe was willing to accept such a candidature.

The President further proposed that Mr. Bob de Graaf be nominated as the next Vice-President. Mr. de Graaf was also willing to accept the candidature; he was also prepared to continue in the function of editor of the League's Newsletter.

The President suggested that he would ask Mr. Mitsuo Nitta to stay on as a member of the Committee, even if Mr. Nitta - who will be the next President of the Japanese association - would not be in a position to serve a full term of three years.

All Committee members agreed with the President's proposals.

The President then read a letter, dated January 22, 1976, written by the President of the German association, and proposing to nominate Dr. Maria Conradt as a new member of the Committee. The Committee decided to second this proposal and to bring this candidature forward at the Presidents' Meeting in September 1976. The President will ask Mrs. Conradt whether she would be willing to act as the Committee's new secretary.

 

9. Any other business: Mr. Tulkens has given the President a draft of the programme which the S.B.L.A.M. has prepared for the next Presidents' Meeting in Brussels (September 28-29, 1976). This is a very attractive programme, and the Committee gratefully accepted the

Belgian invitation.

The data and places of the following Congresses and Presidents' Meetings were briefly discussed. It appeared that invitations have been received up to and including the year 1981.

 

There being no further business, the President thanked all present and closed the meeting at 7.45 p.m.

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