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viaLibri launches German version of its popular website for booklovers: vialibri.net

The world's largest online marketplace for early, rare and out-of-print books is now available to German bibliophiles in their native language. When it started in 2006, viaLibri set itself apart from other similar sites by focusing on the more exacting needs of book collectors, librarians and bibliographic scholars. This important group of book buyers had always been frustrated by the limitations of existing websites that were built primarily as price comparison tools. Rejecting the prevailing assumption that online book buyers were only interested in cheap books, rather than rare or valuable ones, viaLibri built a powerful metasearch engine designed specifically to meet the needs of serious bibliophiles, and not just bargain hunters.

Published on 21 Feb. 2018

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The world’s largest online marketplace for early, rare and out-of-print books is now available to German bibliophiles in their native language.


December 10, 2012. – viaLibri (www.vialibri.net), the international search engine for old and rare books, has just launched a German version of its popular website.

When it started in 2006, viaLibri set itself apart from other similar sites by focusing on the more exacting needs of book collectors, librarians and bibliographic scholars. This important group of book buyers had always been frustrated by the limitations of existing websites that were built primarily as price comparison tools. Rejecting the prevailing assumption that online book buyers were only interested in cheap books, rather than rare or valuable ones, viaLibri built a powerful metasearch engine designed specifically to meet the needs of serious bibliophiles, and not just bargain hunters.

In spite of its English-language interface, German collectors were always among the website’s most active regular users. The new German version now provides them with an interface written in their mother tongue.

After putting the new German version online, viaLibri founder Jim Hinck observed: “Creating a German viaLibri is very important to our future. From the beginning we have recognized that the rare book market is international in scope. The internet is making it even more so. That is why we have always sought to include aggregators, booksellers and libraries from as many countries as possible . We now have major partners in eleven different countries, and will continue to extend that even further as suitable opportunities present themselves. On the other side of things, we are equally eager to accommodate buyers from around the globe. As an example of this, for many years our site has offered a built-in translation function within our search results. We can now translate book listings into and out of over 60 different languages. This feature is unique among bookselling sites, and we would like to do the same thing with our own user interface. Today’s launch moves us in that direction. In 2011 we launched a French version which has been a great success for us. We hope that our new German version will be similarly well-received.”

Book buyers from around the world are increasingly using www.viaLibri.net as their tool of choice for finding elusive old books online. Its versatile search engine was specifically designed to dig through the vast number of books for sale on the internet and sort out the items that best match what the buyer is looking for. As a result, one search using vialibri can locate nearly any used book that is currently offered anywhere online. No other site matches the size or diversity of its sources for books. It is used by thousands of visitors every day to search for both rarities and bargains; and if a wanted item is not available today viaLibri can search for it again tomorrow, and then continuously after that. Buyers with multiple wants can maintain want lists on the site and have their wants searched automatically. But searching on viaLibri is not only limited to books for sale. Thousands of libraries can also be searched from a single form, eliminating the need to find and navigate multiple websites when performing a repetitive search.

For more information please contact:


>>> Jim Hinck at viaLibri

The ILAB Metasearch and the Future of the Online Book Trade


>>> An Interview with Jim Hinck

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