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Video link to "Walking Tour of the Medieval Book Trade in Paris" by Les Enluminures

Video link to "Walking Tour of the Medieval Book Trade in Paris" by Les Enluminures
On April 8, 2017, Christopher de Hamel and Sandra Hindman led a "Walking Tour of the Medieval Book Trade in Paris". Setting off from Notre-Dame, the small group of participants had the opportunity to step into the Middle Ages and learn all about the life and practice of illuminators, scribes, printers and binders. In the video - see link below - Les Enluminures presents snippets from the guided tour to discover.

TO VIEW THE VIDEO - PLEASE FOLLOW THIS LINK 

Video link to "Walking Tour of the Medieval Book Trade in Paris" by Les Enluminures
Paris today is known as a center of art and culture, where lovely things are made and sold. This has been true for centuries. In the Middle Ages, if you wanted a beautiful illuminated manuscripts, Paris was the place to go. From the 13th century, Paris was home to a thriving book trade. The shops of booksellers, parchment makers, scribes, illuminators, and book binders, joined later by fine makers and sellers of printed books, were all found along its streets. It is easier than one might think to walk in medieval and Renaissance Paris, even today. Beginning in front to the Cathedral of Notre Dame where the book trade began, then crossing to the Left Bank, the booksellers of Paris came alive again during this waling tour. 

The outlines of the ancient rue Neuve-Notre-Dame are marked on the paving stones in front of the cathedral of Notre Dame. The professional book trade in Paris began on this street c. 1200, where professional booksellers, parchment makers, scribes, illuminators, and binders had their shops. The rue Neuve continued to be a center for the book trade into the 16th century. 
The walk took participants from the Ile-de-la-Cite to the left bank across the Petit Pont (the present bridge dates from the 19th century, but there was a bridge in the same location during the Middle Ages). 
Across the river, Sandra Hindman and Christopher de Hamel guided the audience to walk south along the rue Saint-Jacques toward the Sorbonne. A university neighborhood in the Middle Ages, this was also the location of the Dominican convent. University professors, students, and friars all needed books, and it was naturally a neighborhood full of the makers and sellers of books. 
For more information about the subject, please contact the office of Les Enluminures. 

Published since 15 May 2017

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