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ILAB Library - All You Need To Know About Rare Books and the Antiquarian Book Trade

  • [+] More Martin Luther - Landmark exhibitions in Germany and the US / Part 2 of 2: German Exhibitions 


    Martin Luther - Landmark exhibitions in Germany and the US / Part 2 of 2: German Exhibitions
    Published since 21 Dec 2016
    It has been 500 years since Martin Luther nailed his 95 theses to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, Germany, condemning the corrupt practice of indulgences. This single act marked the beginning of the Protestant Reformation, a worldwide movement whose legacy can still be felt today, especially in Germany. The Reformation had a profound effect not only on theology and the church but also on culture, science, business, politics, language and education.
    In a previous article, we have highlighted exhibitions in the US. This article will show a number of exhibitions throughout the course of 2017, related to Luther and early printing.
  • [+] More History of Printing in Austria - Druckfrisch. Der Innsbrucker Wagner-Verlag und der Buchdruck in Tirol 


    History of Printing in Austria - Druckfrisch. Der Innsbrucker Wagner-Verlag und der Buchdruck in Tirol
    Published since 04 Jun 2014

    375 years ago Michael Wagner, a printer from Augsburg in Germany, founded a publishing house in Innsbruck, Austria, which is still existing today: Universitätsverlag Wagner. To celebrate the 375th anniversary of the publisher the Tyrolean State Museum Ferdinandeum has organized an impressive exhibition from 13th June to 26th October, 2014, accompanied by an attractive programme with lectures, concerts, guided tours, a children’s workshop, and a conference with leading Austrian and international scholars and scientists, among them ILAB Patron of Honour Murray G. Hall.

  • [+] More A Brief History of Broadsides 


    A Brief History of Broadsides
    Published since 13 Jun 2013

    Samuel F Haven, former librarian for the American Antiquarian Society, presided over one of the largest collections of broadsides in the world. Historians and rare book collectors alike cherish broadsides because they offer snapshots of moments in time, helping us to understand the zeitgeist of that era. Broadsides make ideal complements to a rare book collection, granting the collection greater depth and context.

  • [+] More The 15th Century Equivalent of Your Cat Walking on Your Keyboard 


    The 15th Century Equivalent of Your Cat Walking on Your Keyboard
    Published since 01 Mar 2013

    “The 15th century equivalent of your cat walking on your keyboard”, writes Rebecca J. Rosen, senior associate editor at The Atlantic, are ink pawprints in early printed books. “For cat owners, the scene is too familiar:  You sit down to finally (finally!) get some work done, and along comes kitty, here to stroll across your keyboard.” During the 15th century the ancestors of our beloved kitties walked across - incunabula. What is a big disgrace (or humiliation) for every serious collector, is nothing more than an everyday occurrence for cat lovers.

  • [+] More Early Engraver Played His Cards Right 


    Early Engraver Played His Cards Right
    Published since 08 Nov 2012

    The "Meister der Spielkarten", or "The Master of the Playing Cards" is known only through the 106 engravings that have been attributed to him, including the set of playing cards that he is named for.  The term “master” is reserved for someone who has completed an apprenticeship and ran his own workshop, teaching apprentices.  His presumed students are also unknown but have similar names, such as "The Master of the Nuremberg Passion", "The Master of 1446", and "The Master of the Banderoles".

  • [+] More Collecting Rare Books and First Editions: Johann Froben and The Private Library 


    Collecting Rare Books and First Editions: Johann Froben and The Private Library
    Published since 11 Jan 2012

    "He was the soul of honesty himself, and slow to think evil of others; so that he was often taken in. Of envy and jealousy he knew as little as the blind do of colour. He was swift to forgive and to forget even serious injuries ...  He was enthusiastic for good learning, and felt his work to be his own reward. It was delightful to see him with the first pages of some new book in his hands, some author of whom he approved. His face was radiant with pleasure, and you might have supposed that he had already received a large return of profit. The excellence of his work would bear comparison with that of the best printers of Venice and Rome." (Erasmus)

  • [+] More Yeah, that's him, Gutenberg! 


    Yeah, that's him, Gutenberg!
    Published since 05 Apr 2011

    Sunday Girl meets Sunday Boy, or: The history of printing sung after the famous Blondie tunes on YouTube.

  • [+] More Digital Finding Aid for Early Copies of Edmund Spenser's Works 


    Digital Finding Aid for Early Copies of Edmund Spenser's Works
    Published since 04 Feb 2011

    The Spenser Archive Finding Aid is the first bibliographical database with links to collections all over the world that house 16th and 17th century copies of works by the English poet and colonial administrator Edmund Spenser. The database is open to editors, bibliographers, scholars and students of the history of the book, curators of collections, rare book dealers and private collectors. You can browse editions and folio parts, and you can search for copies in libraries in North America, Europe and Australia. The information has been gathered and carefully checked over many years by dozens of contributors.

  • [+] More Spanish Manuscripts – “Lost Medieval Bibles Found at Hill Museum & Manuscript Library” 


    Spanish Manuscripts – “Lost Medieval Bibles Found at Hill Museum & Manuscript Library”
    Published since 30 Jul 2010

    “Complete microfilms of two early medieval Spanish Bibles dating from the 9th and 10th century that were damaged or destroyed during the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) have been found in the microfilm vault of the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library (HMML), in Minnesota. Before the discovery of the microfilms, scholars thought the two Bibles, known as Codex Complutensis I and Codex Complutensis II, survived only in fragments or in one or two slides.”

  • [+] More The Evidence of the Copy 


    The Evidence of the Copy
    Published since 28 May 2010

    There is a rich potential source of information about the history of Old English scholarship which has hitherto been accorded insufficient attention. In 1982 Eric Stanley made an appeal for “a catalogue of association copies of books relevant to Anglo-Saxon studies, especially of early books” (The Bibliography of Old English, ed. Stanley B. Greenfield, OEN Subsidia 8, p. 5). No scholar has yet taken up the challenge and the production of such a catalogue would indeed be a massive task. There are too many copies, both in libraries and in private collections, with inscriptions and annotations ...

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