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ILAB Library - All You Need To Know About Rare Books and the Antiquarian Book Trade

  • [+] More Collecting Photography - A Thousand Words… 


    Collecting Photography - A Thousand Words…
    Published since 27 Aug 2015

    Neither of my kids, doubtless traumatized by having a bookseller for a father, is much of a reader, but both are splendidly visually literate. He’s a photographer and she’s a florist. Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, and all that other stuff I don’t know how to work, is about images, not words. That’s how we communicate with one another these days. Even our book descriptions depend on images now. Rare is the catalog that is not lavishly illustrated, and if our online listings hope to have any chance of selling, they’d better feature plenty of images. We’re in the cradle period of images and imaging. Some day soon images will be text, and text will be arcane. We will be practitioners of black arts.

  • [+] More South Sea Adventures and Explorations – Third Bibliophile Evening at Paul Kainbacher Rare Books 


    South Sea Adventures and Explorations – Third Bibliophile Evening at Paul Kainbacher Rare Books
    Published since 26 Aug 2015

    Baden (Vienna), 26th September, 2015 - a must for collectors who are interested in rare and fine books on travel and exploration and for all, who are seeking adventures in literary or in real life travelling to one of the most inspiring, wild and romantic regions of the world: the South Sea. Dr. Paul Kainbacher invites customers and colleagues to go on a fascinating journey with books. The Third Bibliophile Evening at his antiquarian bookshop in Baden (Vienna) is dedicated to the history and exploration of the South Sea.

  • [+] More Edinburgh Era – McNaughtan’s Bookshop 


    Edinburgh Era – McNaughtan’s Bookshop
    Published since 24 Aug 2015

    Away to Scotland for a rather special rare book trade occasion last week.  A retirement party for our old friend Elizabeth Strong (McNaughtan’s Bookshop) – not just a retirement party but also a welcome party for Derek and Anna Walker, who are taking over this much-loved bookshop on Haddington Place from Elizabeth. A big day for her, but perhaps an ever bigger one for them. The closing of one era, the opening of another – a passing on of the baton from one generation to the next.  A time for celebration.  A time for reflection.  A goodish crowd of bookish folk.   Edinburgh stalwart Ian Watson (John Updike Rare Books) was there.  Cooper Hay had come over from Glasgow.  Andrew Hunter (Blackwell’s Rare Books) was up from Oxford.   Family, friends, customers.  A few choice words from our president, Oscar Graves-Johnston.  A few words of farewell, welcome and introduction from Elizabeth.  A few words of appreciation and anticipation from the Walkers.

  • [+] More Salon du Livre ancien et de la Bibliophilie de Lourmarin, 21 to 23 August, 2015 


    Salon du Livre ancien et de la Bibliophilie de Lourmarin, 21 to 23 August, 2015
    Published since 21 Aug 2015

    This Fair has become one of the most important bibliophilic events in France. From incunabula to modern first editions, thousands of books will be there waiting to be discovered, and with the new August dates, a numerous and informed public is expected.The beauty of the venue, the celebrated provençal gastronomy, the warmth of the sun as summer draws to a close. This and much more should seduce all connoisseurs of fine books and the pleasures of life.

  • [+] More An Interview with … A Record Breaking Rare Book School Attendee! (Who also Happens to be the Head of Tavistock Books) 


    An Interview with … A Record Breaking Rare Book School Attendee! (Who also Happens to be the Head of Tavistock Books)
    Published since 31 Jul 2015

    The Lord and Master of Tavistock Books recently finished his 21st course at Rare Book School in Charlottesville, Virginia, having started this love-affair back in 1998! To know more, read on!

  • [+] More Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - John Osborne wrote Look Back in Anger 


    Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - John Osborne wrote Look Back in Anger
    Published since 29 Jul 2015

    John Osborne’s play Look Back in Anger (1956) is credited with transforming British theater from escapist fantasies to stark realism. The play came to represent a generation of disaffected Brits after World War II and was hailed as a significant theatrical breakthrough. Osborne was described as the first of the "angry young men," working class British playwrights and novelists who came to prominence in the 1950s. The play was adapted for a 1959 film starring Richard Burton, Claire Bloom, and Mary Ure (whom Osborne married). It was directed by Tony Richardson.

  • [+] More Antiquarian Booksellers in Exile – Lucien Goldschmidt (1912-1992) 


    Antiquarian Booksellers in Exile – Lucien Goldschmidt (1912-1992)
    Published since 27 Jul 2015

    “Lucien Goldschmidt was a citizen of the world”, Nicholas Barker once wrote in The Independent. “He would have liked to be called that, but it would be more true to say that the world of which he was a citizen was one that he had largely created. His life was divided between books and the world of art. Booksellers and art dealers normally lead rather separate careers, but Goldschmidt combined both, giving to each his own individual, highly independent, taste. Words and images combined to form an outlook on the world that was, in one word, civilised.”

  • [+] More Collecting History - Two Hundred Years On, Napoleon Is Still Much More Interesting than Arthur Wellesley 


    Collecting History - Two Hundred Years On, Napoleon Is Still Much More Interesting than Arthur Wellesley
    Published since 23 Jul 2015

    Despite astonishing and terrifying the world with his lightning manoeuvres and remorseless expenditure of human lives, Napoleon and Republican France were ultimately crushed. Exhausted by constant total warfare rather than strategically defeated on the battlefield, Napoleon left France economically ravished and decisively toppled from its position as the most powerful European nation. Thus this final battle, Waterloo, is rightly regarded as one of the most pivotal moments in Modern British history, ushering in a century of rapid economic and colonial expansion, and global naval domination. It is perhaps no coincidence then that our recent post-colonial age has seen these wars and their principle players romanticised by novelists such as Bernard Cornwell, Patrick O’Brian, C. S. Forester, and Douglas Reeman. These patriotic pseudo-historical accounts, often based on extensive research, present the British armed forces at their best – fighting as heroic under-dogs for the last time while saving the rest of Europe from French Republican autocracy. Cornwell’s creation, the Richard Sharpe series, is perhaps the most interesting of these, since the eponymous protagonist manages to be present not only at most of the important battles of the Peninsula War in Portugal and Spain, but also at the Siege of Copenhagen, the naval battle of Trafalgar, and of course the coup de grace, Waterloo.

  • [+] More In the Press - Employee Held in Paris National Library Theft 


    Published since 23 Jul 2015

    Only a few months ago the Bibliothèque nationale de France (BnF) had to report the theft of a considerable number of works by Pieter Bruegel along with rare and valuable maps and atlases. The BnF immediately got into contact with the European libraries and with the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers (ILAB). An ILAB security message was sent out to all affiliates worldwide, the theft was announced on the ILAB Stolen Books Database. Now the French police reports that the thief has been caught.

  • [+] More Collecting Crime (Fiction) - A Very Shocking Shocker 


    Collecting Crime (Fiction) - A Very Shocking Shocker
    Published since 22 Jul 2015

    It was Simon Beattie who kindly put us in touch with a dealer on the continent who had this for sale.  Not something he wanted, but thought we might.  Quite what grounds he had for thinking this, I’m not at all sure – lurid, criminous, obscure author, published by a trio of even more obscure publishers, set in a vividly realised 1890s London, inscribed by the author, no copies on the internet  – nothing at all there to appeal to me that I can see.  As Simon himself likes to deal in ‘The Books You Never Knew You Wanted’ (see his delightful blog of that name: link in the Blogroll) – I suppose this by definition probably makes Death and the Woman one of those books you never knew you didn’t want – but then (to judge from recent sales) that’s probably becoming a fair summary of most of our stock.

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