Skip to main content
Results: 1 - 9 of 9 for "Introduction à l'étude de la médecine expérimentale bernard first"
https://www.sophiararebooks.com/pictures/4473.jpg
Item for sale BERNARD, Claude.

Cours de Physiologie. Unpublished manuscript lecture notes.

[...] Read less

Paris: undated, but ca. January 1869. Precious unpublished manuscript very likely corresponding to the course on general physiology that Claude Bernard delivered at the Collège de France, or possibly the Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle. It is illustrated with 44 sketches in pencil and ink, incl

[...] Read more

uding a watercolor, representing tissues and cells. It is in several different hands, presumably of his students and collaborators (some names are suggested below), and includes numerous marginal corrections and annotations. Only the first few lectures are dated (from 19 to 26 January 1869). Bernard had left the Sorbonne to take up the Chair of General Physiology at the Museum in 1865. The present lectures are evidently a continuation of an earlier course which described how the tissues of the body are composed of cells: it begins with the following passage: "In my last lecture, I introduced the tissues called cells into my theory of tissues from which the body is constructed; you could see, from a series of preparations that, like all the other tissues, they were formed of distinct parts reducing to three essential elements: 1) the skeleton or enveloping membrane, 2) the apparatus of nutrition or nuclei, and 3) the active substance, which in these tissues is represented by a special protoplasm. Thus, I have almost completed the field of histology according to the new ideas that I have explained to you." The lectures preserved in our manuscript build on that earlier course by studying the structure of the individual cells of different types in the body (nerve cells, vascular cells, muscle cells, etc.). "Claude Bernard (1813-78) is regarded as the most important contributor to experimental physiology in the nineteenth century ... Bernard's contributions are so important and so numerous that it is difficult to select one work to represent them. His major physiological discoveries included the role of the pancreas in digestion, the glycogenic function of the liver, the vasomotor innovation, and the effects of curare on neuromuscular transmission. He also introduced seminal theoretical concepts, such as that of 'internal secretion,' and was the author of the landmark medico-philosophical work, Introduction à l'étude de la médecine expérimentale, in which he analyzed the philosophical basis of the scientific method and its application to the study of living beings" (Grolier-Horblit). Although several of Bernard's courses at the Sorbonne and at the National Museum of Natural History were published in the Revue de Cours Scientifiques and elsewhere, that offered here appears to be unpublished. Provenance: Donated by the marine biologist and zoologist Paul Portier (1866-1962) to his student the biologist Maurice Fontaine (1904-2009), who was director of the National Museum of Natural History from 1966 to 1970. The manuscript remained in the Fontaine family until it was offered at auction in 2017. "Born in St. Julien, a village in the wine country of Beaujolais, Bernard's early education was humanistic rather than scientific. He at one time aspired to be a playwright, but when his efforts met with discouragement from the critic Saint Mare-Girardin, he entered the Faculté de Médecine in Paris in 1834. While still a student, Bernard came under the influence of the famous physiologist François Magendie, working as Magendie's assistant from 1841 to 1844 and learning from him the use of animal vivisection for physiological experimentation. It was under Magendie's influence that Bernard performed some of his most important researches into the physiology of digestion and nerves" (Grolier-Horblit). "In December 1847 Bernard was made suppléant [substitute] to Magendie at the Collège de France. At first he gave the course in the winter term, while Magendie continued to teach experimental medicine during the summer semester. In 1852 Magendie retired completely and turned over his chair and his laboratory to Bernard ... On 17 March 1853 he received the doctorate in zoology at the Sorbonne after a brilliant presentation of his thesis, Recherches sur une nouvelle fonction du foie. "Bernard made his principal discoveries early in his scientific career, in the period between his first publication "Recherches anatomiques et physiology quessur la corde du tympan" (1843), and his thesis for the doctorate in science (1853). The discoveries on the chemistry and nerve control of gastric digestion (1843-1845) were followed by the first experiments with curare, the discovery of the role of bile in the digestion of proteins, and research on the innervation of the vocal cords and the functions of the cranial nerves (1844-1845). In 1846 he made his first observations on the mechanism of carbon monoxide intoxication, discovered the difference between the urine of herbivores and that of carnivores, began studies on absorption of fats and the functions of the pancreas, and observed the inhibitory action of the vagus nerveon the heart. He solved the problem of "recurrent sensitivity" in 1847. In August 1848 Bernard discovered the presence of sugar in the blood under fasting conditions (non food-connected glycemia) and the physiological presence of sugar in the liver--which led rapidly to the revolutionary theory attributing a glycogenic function to the liver (October 1848). In February 1849, he published an important paper on the role of the pancreas in digestion and, in the same month, observed for the first time the presence of sugar in the urine after artificial traumatization of some particular cerebral structures. The following year Bernard made other discoveries concerning the metabolism of carbohydrates and resumed fruitful experiments with curare. In 1852 came the discovery of the vasoconstrict or nerves and the description of the syndrome now called the Horner-Bernard syndrome. This period concluded with a critical examination of Lavoisier's theory on the seat of the production of heat in the animal and with the systematic presentation of discoveries concerning animal glycogenesis ... "Bernard consolidated and completed his physiological discoveries between 1854 and 1860: in 1855 he made the experiment of the perfused liver and discovered glycogen; in 1857 he isolated glycogen; in 1858 he discovered the vasodilating nerves; and in 1859 he made experiments on the glycogenic functions of the placenta and of fetal tissues ... "The transition from laboratory work to dogmatic synthesis was mirrored in Bernard's teaching and in his Cahier de notes, 1850-1860 (also called the Cahier rouge). The Cahier clearly demonstrates a change of emphasis from the tenacious pursuit of concrete facts to a concentration on research methods and principles of biological science, and may be said to mark the junction between Bernard's analytical and philosophical work; his teaching led him to the formulation of a comprehensive and didactic theoretical elaboration of his laboratory experience. As early as 1858, Bernard conceived a "plan for a dogmatic work on experimental medicine" in consideration of the new direction indicated by his teaching ... "On 12 December 1868 the chair of general physiology was transferred from the Sorbonne to the Muséum d'Histoire Naturelle; as the titular holder of the chair, Bernard succeeded Flourens (who had held the chair as professor of comparative physiology) on the council of professors of the museum. Flourens's chair was transferred to the Sorbonne, and was awarded to Paul Bert, one of Bernard's most faithful pupils. "In January 1869, after a hiatus of three years, Bernard resumed his courses in experimental medicine at the Collège de France. Although he was only a mediocre lecturer, he was able to hold the attention of his audience by the novelty and vividness of his arguments and by the experiments that he improvised in the amphitheater to support his statements. (At the beginning of his career, Bernard's audiences had been composed almost exclusively of physicians and physiologists, especially foreigners; gradually, however, they became larger, more varied, and more fashionable.) "Bernard's teaching at the College was analytical and dedicated to his own research--demonstrating, as he was wont to say, science in the making rather than science already made. His methods attracted such listeners and collaborators as d'Arsonval, Bert, Dastre, Gréhant, Jousset de Bellesme, Moreau, Pasteur (whose notes made from Bernard's lectures remain unpublished), Ranvier, and Tripier; the Germans Kühne and Rosenthal; the Russians E. de Cyon, Setchenov, and Tarkhanov; the Italians Mossoand Vella; the Dane Panum; the Englishmen Ball and Pavy; such Americans as J. C. Dalton, Austin Flint, W. E. Horner, and S. W. Mitchell; and Emperor Pedro II of Brazil. Even those physiologists and physicians who did not actually attend Bernard's lectures knew his ideas from the ten volumes of Leçons delivered at the Collège de France, publications that ranged from the Leçons de physiologie expérimentale appliquée à la médecine (1855) to the Leçons de physiologie opératoire (published posthumously, 1879.). "The courses that Bernard taught at the Sorbonne were, from their inception, of a more general character. His Leçons sur les proprieties des tissues vivant, delivered in 1864 and published in 1866, illustrate these tendencies. In this course, it was Bernard's aim to "determine the elementary conditions of the phenomena of life," that is, "to return to the elementary condition of the vital phenomenon, a condition that is identical in all animals." In contrast to comparative physiology, general physiology "does not seek to grasp the differences that separate beings, but the common points that unite them and which constitute the essence of the vital phenomena." It is obvious why, when Bernard went to the Muséum d'Histoire Naturelle in 1868, the name of the chair that he was to occupy was changed. "In all the courses that he taught at the Muséum, Bernard sought to demonstrate the vital unity of all organisms. In contrast to the naturalists, Bernard was interested only in vital manifestations that did not differ from species to species. Encouraged by the general development of cellular theory and by his own research on the non-specificity of the nutritive processes, he extended his work into plant physiology. In the first volume of his Leçons phénomenes de la vie communs aux animaux et aux végétaux. (1878), he went beyond the framework of traditional physiology to treat problems of general biology. His last experimental researches dealt with anesthesia of animals, influence of the ether application on plants, embryonic development, and fermentation" (DSB). Manuscript, 145 pages (285 x 195 mm), written on recto and verso (marginal tears with some minor losses, last leaf with larger tear cauisng more significant loss, repaired with adhesive tape).

Bookseller : SOPHIA RARE BOOKS $ 9.500 Buy from: Direct From Seller
https://www.milestone-books.de/pictures/002730_01.JPG
Item for sale BERNARD, Claude

I. Leçons de physiologie expérimentale. - II. Leçons sur la physiologie et la pathologie du système nerveux. - III. Introduction à l'étude de la médecine expérimentale. - IV. Leçons sur les effets des substances toxiques et médicamenteuses. - V. Leçons sur les propriétés physiologiques et les altérations pathologiques des liquides de l'organisme. - VI. Leçons de pathologie expérimentale. - VII. Leçons sur les anesthésiques et sur l'asphyxie. - VIII. Leçon sur la chaleur animale, sur les effets de la chaleur et sur la fièvre. - IX. Leçons sur le diabète et la glycogenèse animale. - X. Leçons sur les phénomènes de la vie commune aux animaux et aux végétaux.

[...] Read less

Paris: Baillière, 1855. 1st Edition. Hardcover. 8vo - over 7¾ - 9¾" tall. [Oeuvres diverses]. Paris: Baillière, 1855-1878. A fine set of 10 works in 13 volumes uniformily bound in fine contemporary red three-quarter morocco over marbled boards with gilt-lettered spines and gilt top-edges (other edge

[...] Read more

s untrimmed), marbled endpapers, little rubbing to extremities. Half-title to each volume. Text with scattered light foxing as usual, otherwise quite crisp and clean. Provenance: Dr. Berchon (name lettered at foot of each spine). A fine set seldom found as complete as here. Works contained are: I. Leçons de physiologie expérimentale, 1855-56, 2 volumes. - II. Leçons sur la physiologie et la pathologie du système nerveux, 1858, 2 volumes. - III. Introduction à l'étude de la médecine expérimentale, 1865. - IV. Leçons sur les effets des substances toxiques et médicamenteuses, 1867. - V. Leçons sur les propriétés physiologiques et les altérations pathologiques des liquides de l'organisme, 1869, 2 volumes. - VI. Leçons de pathologie expérimentale, 1872. - VII. Leçons sur les anesthésiques et sur l'asphyxie, 1875. - VIII. Leçon sur la chaleur animale, sur les effets de la chaleur et sur la fièvre, 1876. - IX. Leçons sur le diabète et la glycogenèse animale, 1877. - X. Leçons sur les phénomènes de la vie commune aux animaux et aux végétaux, 1878. ---- FIRST EDITIONS of Bernard's series of published lectures. 'Lecons de physiologie expérimentale', the first published lecture, is a fundamental work on the application of experimental physiology to medicine and on the creation of new concepts to facilitate generalization from experimental results. - Visit our website for additional images and information. Near Fine.

Bookseller : Milestones of Science Books $ 5.243 Buy from: AbeBooks $ 5.067 Buy from: Direct From Seller
https://pictures.abebooks.com/ARGOSY/1128121113.jpg
Item for sale BERNARD, Claude

Introduction a l'Etude de la Medecine Experimentale

[...] Read less

Bailliere, Paris. 3-400pp (lacks the half title). 8vo, contemporary calf- backed marbled boards (edgeworn; joints and spine ends neatly repaired; several ex-library stamps but otherwise a very clean copy). Paris, London & Madrid: J.B. Bailliere et Fils, 1865. Second issue of the first edition. Scarc

[...] Read more

e. The second issue of this historic work - with 3 cities listed on the title page, and "Martinet" on page 400. This is Bernard's most important theoretical contribution, in which he bridges the gap between experimental physiology, of which he was the unrivalled master, and the philosophy of science. "Medical historians are unanimous in considering [this] as a landmark in the history of medical thought, and it is still recommended today as valuable and stimulating reading for those about to embark on a career in the bio- medical sciences." -Grande. "Probably the greatest classic on the principles of physiological investigation and of the scientific method as applied to the life sciences" -GM 1766.501; PMM 353; Waller 951; Osler 1511; Horblit 11b. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

Bookseller : Argosy Book Store, ABAA, ILAB $ 1.000 Buy from: AbeBooks $ 1.000 Buy from: ABAA $ 1.000 Buy from: Biblio
Item for sale Bernard, Claude

Introduction a l'etude de la medecine experimentale

[...] Read less

Baillière, Paris, 1865. 400pp. 212 x 131 mm. 19th cent. quarter morocco, boards, light edgewear, spine a bit faded. Name clipped from flyleaf, some foxing, but very good. First edition, five-imprint issue. Bernard's masterly justification and exposition of the use of the experimental method in study

[...] Read more

ing life phenomena has remained a classic of both scientific and philosophical literature. Printing and the Mind of Man 353. Horblit 11b. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

Bookseller : Jeremy Norman's historyofscience $ 1.000 Buy from: AbeBooks $ 1.000 Buy from: ABAA $ 1.000 Buy from: Biblio
Item for sale Bernard, Claude

Introduction a l'etude de la medecine experimentale

[...] Read less

Baillière, Paris, 1865. 400pp. 212 x 131 mm. 19th cent. quarter morocco, mottled boards, light edgewear, spine a bit darkened. Very good. First edition, three-imprint issue. Bernard's masterly justification and exposition of the use of the experimental method in studying life phenomena has remained

[...] Read more

a classic of both scientific and philosophical literature. Printing and the Mind of Man 353. Horblit 11b. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

Bookseller : Jeremy Norman's historyofscience $ 1.000 Buy from: AbeBooks $ 1.000 Buy from: ABAA $ 1.000 Buy from: Biblio
Item for sale BERNARD, Claude

Introduction à l'étude de la médecine expérimentale.

[...] Read less

Paris, London, and Madrid: J.-B. Baillière, 1865. 400 pp. Contemporary 1/4-leather and marbled boards. Slightly foxed. Very Good. Second Issue. The first and second issues can be distinguished by the imprint at the bottom of the half-title and p. 400 (Crété in first issue; Martinet in second) or by

[...] Read more

the number of cities in the Baillière imprint on the title page (five in first issue; three in second). Garrison-Morton 1766.501: "Probably the greatest classic on the principles of physiological investigation and of the scientific method as applied to the life sciences." PMM 353. Grolier, One Hundred Books Famous in Science 11b (this copy has the first of the two title pages illustrated). Heirs of Hippocrates 1797. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

Bookseller : Scientia Books, ABAA ILAB $ 830 Buy from: AbeBooks
https://pictures.abebooks.com/42LIGNE/21184518334.jpg
Item for sale

Leçons de physiologie expérimentale appliquée à la médecine, faites au Collège de France, par m. Claude Bernard.

[...] Read less

[Place of publication not identified] : [publisher not identified]. A la suite de ses immenses travaux expérimentaux et dix ans avant la publication de son chef-d'oeuvre philosophique Introduction à l'étude de la médecine expérimentale, Claude Bernard publie cette série de leçons. Dès la première le

[...] Read more

çon, il rend hommage à son prédécesseur Magendi et traite de la « nature spéciale de l'enseignement du Collège de France comparée à l'enseignement des Facultés ». In-8, broché, couverture imprimée d'origine, deuxième plat détaché, bien complet du catalogue J.-B. Baillère, à la bonne date. Cachet hospitalier ancien sur la page de titre. VIII, 512 pp., 48 pp de catalogue. - - - - 8vo, 23 cm, viii, 512 pp, 48 pp publisher's catalogue dated Novembre 1855, 22 ills, The first of the 10 volume series of Leçons written by Bernard and containing his classic work on the liver The second volume of Leçons de Physiologie Expérimentale was published in 1856 and although normally regarded as a two volume work, this first part may be considered as complete in its own right. Garrison notes in his History of Medicine: "Much of our knowledge of the digestive and vaso-motor systems was developed by Claude Bernard (1813-78) the greatest physiologist of modern France.All of Bernard's greatest discoveries were based upon accidentally discovered facts, which he used as clues to larger results through his wonderful power of thinking physiologically. It came to be said of him that he was no mere physiologic experimenter, but "physiology itself".By 1857, he had, through a number of ingenious experiments, established the glycogenic function of the liver upon a permanent basis, and had succeeded in isolating glycogen." [Attributes: First Edition; Soft Cover]

Bookseller : LA 42EME LIGNE - LIBRAIRIE-GALERIE $ 64 Buy from: AbeBooks
Item for sale FONTENELLE, BERNARD LE BOYER (BOVIER) De. - THE PROGRAM OF THE ENLIGHTMENT

Preface.

[...] Read less

Paris, Jean Boudot, 1702. 4to. Without wrappers. Extracted from "Mémoires de l'Academie des Sciences". Année 1699. With the fine engraved frontispiece and the titlepage to the volume. (22) pp. Stamped in blind on the 2 first leaves, in margins. First appearance of Fontenelle's famous program for the

[...] Read more

philosophy of science of the Enlightment, stipulating the nature of scientific research in terms of the analytical geometry."From 1699 to 1740 Fontenelle devoted himself almost exclusively to his task of editing the Histoire de l’Académie royale des sciences . . . avec les mémoires de mathématique et de physique pour la même année, tirés des registres de cette Académie. The volume for the year 1699, which appeared in 1702, opens with an untitled preface usually called "Préface [sometimes "Discours préliminaire"] sur l’utilitë des mathématiques et de la physique et sur les travaux de l’Académie (the paper offered), which contains essential material on the philosophy of science and is a sort of bridge between Descartes’s Discours de la méthode and Claude Bernard’s Introduction à l’étude de la médecine expérimentale. Here one finds the first literary expression of the idea of the interdependence of the sciences and of the constancy of the laws of nature." [Attributes: Soft Cover]

Bookseller : Lynge & Søn ILAB-ABF $ 302 Buy from: maremagnum.com
Item for sale FONTENELLE, BERNARD LE BOYER (BOVIER) De. - THE PROGRAM OF THE ENLIGHTMENT

Preface.

[...] Read less

Paris, Jean Boudot, 1702. 4to. Without wrappers. Extracted from "Mémoires de l'Academie des Sciences". Année 1699. With the fine engraved frontispiece and the titlepage to the volume. (22) pp.. Stamped in blind on the 2 first leaves, in margins. ¶ First appearance of Fontenelle's famous program for

[...] Read more

the philosophy of science of the Enlightment, stipulating the nature of scientific research in terms of the analytical geometry."From 1699 to 1740 Fontenelle devoted himself almost exclusively to his task of editing the Histoire de l'Académie royale des sciences . . . avec les mémoires de mathématique et de physique pour la même année, tirés des registres de cette Académie. The volume for the year 1699, which appeared in 1702, opens with an untitled preface usually called "Préface [sometimes "Discours préliminaire"] sur l'utilitë des mathématiques et de la physique et sur les travaux de l'Académie (the paper offered), which contains essential material on the philosophy of science and is a sort of bridge between Descartes's Discours de la méthode and Claude Bernard's Introduction à l'étude de la médecine expérimentale. Here one finds the first literary expression of the idea of the interdependence of the sciences and of the constancy of the laws of nature.

Bookseller : Herman H J Lynge & Søn A/S $ 281 Buy from: Antikvariat